MULTIPURPOSE TREE

 

Wood product_icon

 

01    WOOD PRODUCTS

 

For decades, Japanese craftsmen have utilized Paulownia as revered wood in ceremonial furniture, musical instruments, decorative mouldings, laminated structural beams and shipping containers.

Paulownia wood is marketed primarily for specialty wood products, oriented strand board, veneer. The total consumption of Paulownia wood in Japan was approximately 17 million board feet (MBF) during 1971-1973. In a few years, imported Paulownia wood volume increased from 16% to 60% of total consumption.

USES FOR PAULOWNIA WOOD

  • Construction

    - Interior framing, including door and window frames

    - Architraves

    - Cabinet making

    - Wall paneling and folding partitions

    - Plywood, particleboard, and flake-board

    - Furniture, especially with doors and drawers

    - Automobile and yacht interiors

    - Paneling and partitions in airplanes and ships

    - Boat construction and paddles

    - Beehive construction

    (resistant to cracking and warping, good insulation

    qualities, lightweight)

  • Containers

    - Decorative containers

    (pails, jewelry boxes, bowls, etc.)

    - Humidors and cigar boxes

    - Lining for safe deposit boxes

    - Coffin construction

    - Pallets, boxes and crates

    (lightweight airfreight crating minimizes shipping costs)

    - Packing material

    (natural insulation, biodegradable packing, no odor or taste)

    - Food and gift packing

    (cuts thin, light and strong, free from odor or flavor: could pack specialty foods such as cheese, fruit, coffee, etc.)

  • Other uses

    - Arts and crafts: small stock

    (from crown of tree) used for paint brush handles, pencils, charcoal bars for sketching, etc.

    - Shoe and sandal manufacturing

    - Inscription plaques

    - Filtration material for evaporation coolers

Landscape_icon

 

02    LANDSCAP

Paulownia tomentosa was introduced into the eastern U.S. more than 150 years ago as a landscape tree.

Flowers & leaves as livestock holder_icon

 

03    FLOWERS & LEAVES AS LIVESTOCK FODDER

Paulownia flowers and leaves are a good source of fat, sugar and protein, and utilized as fodder for pigs, sheep and rabbits.

 

Nitrogen content in Paulownia leaves can be compared favourably with someleguminous plants.

 

Paulownia leaves are used as green manure crop by famers in Kwangsi, China.

Inflorescences for honey production_icon

 

04    INFLORESCENCES FOR HONEY PRODUCTION

Paulownia inflorescences are large in size and a good source of honey

Stem bark for herbal medicine

 

05   STEM BARK FOR HERBAL MEDICINE

Paulownia’s stem bark has been used in Chinese herbal medicine and erysipelas (Kang et al., 1999). It is also used among Chinese folks to treat bronchitis, dysentery, bacterial dysentery, acute enteritis, parotitis and acute conjunctivitis, etc. (Liao et al., 2008).

Paulownia as potential biomass corp_icon

 

06    PAULOWNIA AS POTENTIAL BIOMASS CROP

With a shift in paradigm in favor of alternative fuels, a change from food and feedstock to non-food and feed-stock sources for cellulosic ethanol is mandatory. The US has already mandated a goal of producing 36 billion gallons of biofuels by 2022 via the Renewable Fuels Standard, RFS2. In a biomass comparison study performed in Germany, P. tomentosa (12.7 tons·ha−1) out-produced Salix viminalis (8.2 tons·ha−1) on short rotation coppice under dry land conditions.

 

Lipids in P. tomentosa seed extract consist of linoleic (64.1%), oleic (21.2% and palmitic acids (7.3%). -Tocopherol (approx. 100.0%) predominated in the tocopherol fraction, and in the sterol fraction—-sitosterol (79.2%), campesterol (10.3%) and stigmasterol (7.7%) were the dominant components. Though lipid profile of seeds suitable for biodiesel production, it would potentially be labor-intensive due to high number of small seed production. Seeds contain 10.6% protein, 9.5% cellulose and 38.2% hydrolysable carbohydrates.

 

Excellent carbon sequestration_icon

 

07    EXCELLENT CARBON SEQUESTRATION

Emission of carbon dioxide, a greenhouse gas, accumulates in the atmosphere is a major cause of rising temperatures. Scientists predict that climate change will cause severe disruptions, such as weather-related natural disasters, droughts and famines, which may lead to enormous loss of life. Global warming between 1.6 and 2.8 degrees Celsius over the next three decades would raise sea levels by half a metre.

Research showed that Eucalyptus melanophloia tree with age of 56 years having diameter and height of 35.81 cm and 14.9 meter, respectively sequestered 1060 kg of CO2 while Paulownia tomentosa tree with age of 18 years having diameter and height of 45.21 and 13.72 meter, respectively sequestered 1552kg of CO2 (Afzal. M and Akhtar A.M, 2013).

CARBON SEQUESTRATION OF DIFFERENT TREE SPECIES

 

Species Age
(Year)
Av. Dia
(m)
Av. Height
(m)
Total trees CO2
seq/tree (kg)
Total
CO2 seq (kg)
Euc. melanophlola 58 35.81 14.9 12 1060 12720
Paulownia tomentosa 18 45.21 13.72 1 1552 1552

Source: Afzal. M and Akhtar A.M, 2013

Other applications_icon

 

08    OTHER APPLICATIONS

Paulownia has been used for agroforestry, biomass production, land reclamation, animal waste remediation.

 

ENVIRONMENTAL AND SOCIO-ECONOMIC BENEFITS OF PAULOWNIA

  • WATER

    Paulownia can be used to help alleviate the problem of livestock effluent. This liquid run-off can be a big problem, especially for dairy and pig farmers. A Paulownia plantation surrounding such a farm—in any configuration—can help consume much of the run-off, while producing shade, honey and wood at the same time.

     

    Effluent from food processing plants (such as fish and shrimp processing) can be piped to Paulownia plantations where it can enhance the growth of trees, and the trees in turn can provide industry with carbon credits.

     

    Paulownia will also flourish from the use of gray water and sewage run-off (Timothy Hall, 2008).

  • LAND

    Paulownia can be used to help alleviate the problem of livestock effluent. This liquid run-off can be a big problem, especially for dairy and pig farmers. A Paulownia plantation surrounding such a farm—in any configuration—can help consume much of the run-off, while producing shade, honey and wood at the same time.

     

    Effluent from food processing plants (such as fish and shrimp processing) can be piped to Paulownia plantations where it can enhance the growth of trees, and the trees in turn can provide industry with carbon credits.

     

    Paulownia will also flourish from the use of gray water and sewage run-off (Timothy Hall, 2008).

  • AIR

    When it comes to improving air quality, Paulownia is a star! It is an excellent plant for the sequestration of carbon and giving off of oxygen.

     

    As noted earlier, the plant is a fast grower, and the faster it produces wood (where carbon is stored) the more carbon will be taken up (Timothy, 2008).